Lecture: SUSTAINBALE ISLAND TECHNOLOGIES: THE CASE OF OKINAWA / CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND CONSTRAINTS OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION IN

Wednesday, December 16, 2009
12:00 noon – 1:00 PM
John A. Burns Hall, Room 3012, 3rd floor

Two EWC Research Program lectures:
Seminar on Okinawa’s Sustainable Island Development
1. SUSTAINBALE ISLAND TECHNOLOGIES: THE CASE OF OKINAWA
by Hiroshi Kakazu
2. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND CONSTRAINTS OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION IN OKINAWA
by Hideki Uehara

1. SUSTAINBALE ISLAND TECHNOLOGIES: THE CASE OF OKINAWA

Okinawa shares many common development issues with the Pacific island countries/regions including their small size, isolation, fragmentation, resource limitation and fragility, and vulnerability to natural disasters and outside economic and political impacts beyond their control. As such Okinawa’s situation and experiences can be very useful in terms of developing appropriate models for sustainable development in this region. Okinawa, in particular, has developed various subtropical and island-based “zero-emission” or “renewal” type of technologies and know-how such as re-use and recycle of abandoned glass bottles, waste vegetable oil, renewable energy, fruits fly and sweet potato weevil eradication, underground dam, deep-sea water utilization, fishing and environmental conservation, water management, digital information and communication technology (ICT), eco-tourism, networking island communities, distance education and medicine, and tourism-related "niche" technologies and innovations such as health therapy and health foods which may be applied to the Pacific island countries with appropriate modifications. This seminar will discuss major island technologies developed and successfully applied in Okinawa. The seminar will be followed by an international symposium on “Challenge and Opportunities for the Pacific Islands in a Globalized World: Focusing on Transfer of Okinawa and Hawaii’s Sustainable Island Technologies and Innovation to the Pacific developing islands”. The seminar will be held at Meio University in Okinawa on February 26, 2010. Your positive participation in the seminar would be highly appreciated.

Hiroshi Kakazu is an adjunct professor of Meio University in Okinawa. Kakazu has served as Visiting Research Fellow and Professor to the London School of Economics, the East-West Center (Fulbright Senior Scholar), the University of the Philippines (Japan Foundation) and others. He has also worked in positions as Economist of the Asian Development Bank, Professor and Dean of the International University of Japan, Professor of the Graduate School of International Development at Nagoya University, Vice Governor of the Okinawa Development Finance Corporation, Professor of Nihon University, Vice President of the University of the Ryukyus and Vice President of Temple University of Japan (Tokyo). He is the co-founder of the International Small Islands Studies Association (ISISA), Vice President of the International Scientific Council for Island Development (UNESCO-INSULA), President of Coconuts University, President of the Japan Society of Island Studies, and a member of the UNESCO panel of Experts on Culture and Tourism. He has served on various governmental panels including the Okinawa Development Promotion Council (currently Vice Chairman appointed by Prime Minister). He has authored several books on the Asia-Pacific economies including Island Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities for Okinawa and Other Pacific Islands in a Globalized World (Canada's Trafford Publishing, 2009), Sustainable Development of Small Island Economies (Westview Press, 1994) and Problems and Prospects of Asiatic Patterns of Development: Lessons of ADB’s Thirty Years' of Experiences ( Nagoya University Press, 1997, the book received the 10th Asia-Pacific Award). He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Nebraska in 1971.

2. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND CONSTRAINTS OF ETHANOL PRODUCTION IN OKINAWA

Hideki Uehara
Professor, Meisei University

Wednesday, December 16, 2009.
12:00 noon – 1:00 PM
John A. Burns Hall, Room 3012, 3rd floor

The rise of concerns over the combination of environmental issues and rising petroleum prices raised interest in biofuels production in many parts of Japan. Okinawa is no exception to that trend, and two major bio-ethanol production experiments started a few years ago in both Miyako-island and Ie Island in Okinawa Prefecture. Each of these projects shares a common feature of using sugarcane molasses as raw inputs for ethanol production. Another common feature has to be mentioned here: although these projects have been carried out independently by private firms, a major support comes from public sectors, local as well as central governments.

This is an interim report focused on issues of biofuels production in Okinawa. Specifically I will try to introduce current developments and constraints of Bioethanol production by comparing those two projects based on island sustainability. Key words are: Small island sub tropical eco-system, sustainability, carbon neutral, a local production cycle, bio-ethanol, sugarcane molasses, and sugarcane farm.